Press

Press and Publicity Contact –      Roger Harvey 

email   dacorumcommunitychoirpress@virginmedia.com

Press Release dated 5th October 2017

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Choir’s wet weather boost

Dacorum Community Choir and its audiences will benefit from one of the latest grants to be awarded by the Boxmoor Trust, especially in wet weather.

The grant of £1,970 will provide equipment including staging, a wireless headset and speaker, and a gazebo.

As well as sheltering the singers, the gazebo will protect the keyboard (bought with a previous grant from the trust) and other electronic gear in damp weather.

“It will mean we can accept outdoor bookings where no shelter is available, which we’ve had to turn down in the past,” said DCC chairman Sally Davies.

“Getting out into the community is an important part of what we do and this generous grant from Boxmoor Trust will enable us to reach more people.

“We’re already known as the friendly choir; maybe we’ll also be called the all-weather choir, who knows?”

The collapsible staging plus stage speaker will help the choir, the conductor and audiences to see and hear each other better. With the wireless headset, musical director Rufus Frowde will be able to communicate with the choir and audience hands-free, avoiding problems with interference from a hand-held microphone.

As well as singing for their own enjoyment, DCC give performances in care homes and clubs. They have also sung in the open at venues such as Sunnyside Rural Trust’s Hemel Food Garden, in aid of the Air Ambulance in Gadebridge Park and at various Christmas Lights events in Hemel Hempstead.

The choir has around a hundred members and meets to practise each Tuesday morning in term time at the Church of the Resurrection behind Grovehill shops. No auditions or experience are necessary. Just turn up and enjoy singing in a friendly informal group.

There’s lots more information at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

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Press Release dated 1st October 2017

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Giving old Henry the heave-ho?

 No one likes a complaint, but the best kind is one that comes from inside the organisation and is already being addressed even before it has been made. And better still if it’s not really a complaint at all, but a constructive suggestion.

Towards the end of the first committee meeting of term, we opened up the Suggestion Box to find a single item inside from a true stalwart – the founder chairman of DCC no less – who has the best interests of the choir at heart.

Could we, she suggested, avoid singing some of our regular numbers in circumstances where they are not really appropriate?

She had in mind two songs in particular: Adieu Sweet Amaryllis – a kind of 1598 version of Breaking Up is Hard to Do, and Pastime With Good Company, apparently a favourite song of Henry VIII, listing some of his preferred leisure activities and asserting his determination to pursue them come what may.

Both are challenging ditties for the choir, and for audiences too, because of their intricate rhythms and obscure vocabulary. So perhaps they’re not guaranteed to go down a storm at, for example, a fire station open day or a charity garden fundraiser. (To be fair, the small but appreciative audience at one such recent event demanded an encore at the end of a programme which included Pastime.)

Better-known songs from modern musicals are more likely to be popular in such venues, the contributor to our Suggestion Box suggested.

As luck would have it, we had already introduced two such hits to our repertoire, Sunrise Sunset from Fiddler on the Roof, and Comedy Tonight from A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.  

And on the very first day of the autumn term, we’d begun to learn songs from more recent musical theatre which, although less famous, deserve to be better known. Listen out at our future performances for Corner of the Sky, from the 2013 Broadway musical Pippin, and Seasons of Love from the rock musical Rent — a present-day take on La Boheme.

You can never please all of the people all of the time. We all have our favourites, singers and audience members alike. Our musical director, who obviously loves the job, has the tricky task of choosing repertoire that develops and demonstrates the choir’s competence, broadens our musical understanding, surprises, stimulates and entertains.

In the past, it’s ranged from world music from the Congo to the Clyde, through the Beatles to Bach, not forgetting the Flying Pickets and Purcell. But for the time being perhaps – in fire stations and greenhouses at least — it could be adieu to Tudorbethan madrigals.

More about DCC at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

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Press Release dated September 2017

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Back to la vie quotidienne

By the time you read this, we’ll be in the midst of what the French call « la Rentrée ». To us more prosaic Anglo-Saxons, it’s just “back to work” or the start of a new school year.  You could translate it as ‘Back to the daily routine, the daily grind, the usual slog.’

Alas, there was no holiday in France for me this year, though I did enjoy an extended weekend with other members of Dacorum Community Choir in the Netherlands in May and at the time of writing I’m about to head off to Scotland for a week while it’s still part of the UK.

Memo to self: make a point of going back to France before Brexit. The French have happily waved us through while we’ve been EU members, but you can bet your bottom Euro they could be bloody-minded after we leave. Businesses may fret about Brexit’s effects, but tourists will fume when they’re delayed at the border, assuming the plunge in the pound doesn’t reduce British tourists to a trickle by then.

Although our exotic neighbours across the Channel increasingly use English words in everyday life, they have a knack of coining terms which are virtually untranslatable into English, either because they’re so pithy or so vague and general: nuance, finesse, entente, détente, milieu, sang froid, are among French expressions so useful that we’ve absorbed them into English. They’re just the right words. Mots justes, you might say. Strangely there seems to be no equivalent for bloody-minded.

To the British ear, « La Rentrée » sounds rather grandiose, over-egging the pudding, gilding the lily, overstating the obvious. You could translate it straightforwardly as “the return”, but the alternative rendering “re-entry” is much more dramatic, like returning from space, the family spacecraft risking skidding off the atmosphere because the angle of approach is too oblique or burning up because it’s too steep.

Safely back on Earth in Dacorum, the start of a new term for our community choir is a time to glance back briefly and look ahead to the autumn term.

During the summer break a group of twenty or so members ‘went out into the community’, as is our wont, to sing for elderly residents and visitors at Compass Point in Northchurch. And we’re entertaining the general public at the open day at Hemel fire station in Queensway on Saturday September 9.

Our Tuesday morning rehearsals re-start on September 12 (9.40am) and at the end of that week we’ll again be supporting our current annual charity, Sunnyside Rural Trust, at its autumn open day in the Hemel Food Garden in Two Waters Road on Saturday September 16.

Looking further ahead, after our annual quiz at Warners End Community Centre on Friday October 6 and our AGM on October 10, we’ll be providing entertainment at St Mary’s (Redbourn) Day Centre on Wednesday October 25 and singing at a Friendship Tea organised by Age UK at Phyllis Courtnage House in Highfield, Hemel Hempstead, on Friday November 3. (Please check our website as dates may change.)

Details of our programme in the run-up to Christmas will appear in Boxmoor Direct nearer the time, but a high point will undoubtedly be our Christmas Concert at St Mary’s church in Hemel Hempstead High Street on Saturday December 16 (4pm).

We hope you’ll enjoy hearing us at one or more of these events. Better still come and sing with us. You’ll find more about why we’re known as the friendly daytime choir at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

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Press Release dated 23rd July 2017

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Singing our heads off

Dacorum Community Choir could soon have a new logo. But how do you sum up the choir in a visual image, that’s just one of the problems. And should the choir have a new name while we’re at it?

As DCC broke up for the summer holidays, members of the committee were beginning to ponder such weighty matters as the choir’s image and identity.

Somehow or another we’ve managed for nearly a decade without a logo as such, not counting the “singing heads”, designed by former choir member Clara Willmott, which feature on a banner at many of our performance.

The singing heads nicely sum up DCC’s diverse make-up, as well as the pleasure we get from singing together, and the concentration involved in doing so.

But they are a bit Radio Four. You know, “the kind of people who believe in recycling and picking up litter”, as an American commentator put it recently. Not that there’s anything wrong with either activity.

Maybe what’s needed is a symbol that avoids depicting the human form altogether. One suggestion under consideration is a kind of oak tree made up of musical notes. It would fit in nicely with the Tudor oak which is part of Dacorum’s corporate image and all the values of solidity and heritage which oaks entail.

But, despite the support we are grateful to get from local councillors, we’re not a branch of the borough council and neither do we have any connection with a certain political party that reworked oak trees as part of its image re-vamp.

Maybe in this post-Blair, post-Cameron and soon-perhaps-to-be (at time of writing) post-May era, we’re moving out of the age of obsession with image into greater concern with matters of substance. Who knows, in a year or two, maybe we’ll even recognize that we’re a country whose future is unavoidably bound up with Europe?

But until the new term begins, and perhaps some time afterwards, weighty affairs will just have to wait, to quote a lyric from Sondheim’s Comedy Tonight which is in our current repertoire. In the meantime, the choir’s name stays as it is and says it all: our members come from all over Dacorum and Community is our middle name.

Members of DCC will be singing in the community during the holiday period, on Thursday August 10 at Compass Point in Northchurch (2.30pm).

Our autumn term begins on Tuesday September 12 (9.40 to 11.30am). We meet every Tuesday morning during school term at the Church of the Resurrection, Grovehill Community Centre, behind the shops at Henry Wells Square, Hemel Hempstead HP2 6BJ.

No experience of singing is necessary, no auditions are required, and you don’t even have to read music. Just turn up and see what fun it can be. More details at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

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Press release dated 27th June 2017

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Side by Side

Members of Dacorum Community Choir will help to mark the fortieth anniversary of Grovehill Community Centre and the Church of the Resurrection, at the church, which is the choir’s regular rehearsal venue, on Thursday July 13 at 5pm (tickets £5 including tea and cakes).

Side by Side, the name we’ve given to our concert, emerged by one of those mysterious processes of osmosis that sometimes produce results better than might have been expected.

There were those who thought it risked conjuring up comical memories of the 1930s Crazy Gang:

Oh we ain’t got a barrel of money

Maybe we’re ragged and funny

But we travel along

Singing a song,

Side by Side.

But the title is highly appropriate in a number of ways.  

Grovehill church exists literally side by side in the same building as the community centre for Grovehill, a bold and practical 1970s experiment which is unique to this neighbourhood of Hemel Hempstead and seems to have worked well.

The church part of the building is shared by several religious denominations without undue spillage of blood on the carpet.

The community choir is not a church choir, but our partnership with the Church of the Resurrection is mutually beneficial. Not least when a stalwart group of ladies provide us with delicious refreshments after our practice sessions in return for contributions to the church’s good causes. It’s as close as you can get to having your cake and eating it.

Now there is talk of possible collaboration between our founding musical director Rufus Frowde and the minister, the Rev. Austin Janes (who has the reputation of being something of a creative wordsmith), on a composition to mark the choir’s tenth anniversary.      

A couple of years ago, the jazz pianist and composer Pete Letanka, son of a local doctor, wrote a modern version of Land of Hope and Glory aimed at youth choirs. It’s now part of DCC’s repertoire.

It starts with the words “We will tell you a story of a dream we can become, a land of hope and glory standing shoulder to shoulder as one”, and ends “Unified, Side by Side, Dignified we are one”.

Following the public’s response to the recent terrorist atrocities and what appears to have been an atrocity by wilful neglect at Grenfell Tower, “Side by Side” seems to capture the national mood of the moment.

Those of a religious bent might say the Spirit moves in mysterious ways.

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Press Release dated 22nd May 2017

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A world premiere and some home truths

Travel broadens the mind, they say. A weekend mini-tour to Amsterdam was certainly a learning experience for thirty or so DCC members plus supporters.We were warmly welcomed in a country where everything seems to work.

OK, so the heating was off in the cavernous Catholic basilica in nearby Haarlem where we made our debut, but we were shown to a comfortable recently-renovated undercroft with plentiful hot drinks and loos. (More experienced touring choirs know this is not always the case.)

Knocking knees notwithstanding (and it wasn’t just the cold), we gave the first-ever performance of a short mass in Latin written by our musical director Rufus Frowde, which he’d given to the choir only the previous week. Et in terra pax, hominibus bonae voluntatis. Peace and goodwill to all men. Even to musical directors.

A soprano spoke for most of us, as we filed off the altar steps. “Well that’s something I’ve never done before.” There was a warm glow of achievement that we’d pulled it off. All the more so when the officiating clergyman described us as Meistersingers. He was flattering us, of course, especially as much more illustrious choirs are scheduled to sing there.

The following morning, at a lively ecumenical Protestant church in the centre of Amsterdam, an even warmer welcome included coffee and stropwaffels. And memorable words from the pastor:

“You are from a very beautiful district in England …. with green pastures, old villages and churches. It is our pleasure that you are here to sing in a manner that everyone can sing with you without much study or difficult rehearsals. Just for the pleasure of singing together and feel that you can do something that makes community”.

That sums us up nicely!

Our singing in English, Dutch and Hebrew, with Judi Kelly accompanying us, was broadcast live on the internet. An edited recording will soon be on our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org . We’re also on Facebook now.

And so back to England. The escalator out of order at Luton airport, chaos worthy of a banana republic at passport control. Hemel’s green pastures and pot-holes beckoning. Better footpaths being promised by candidates for the county council, as if in some distant Utopia.  Our EU neighbours take for granted  decent road surfaces, pavements and even cycleways; we struggle because of our fetish about cutting public spending.

It was good to be home, as always, and to have something to grumble about.

But there was no time to waste. We had to gear up quickly for our Spring concert the following Saturday, which drew an appreciative audience of more than 130 who joined in the fun of our final number, Great Day.

The whole choir back together, singing the songs we love to sing … and doing something that makes community.RTS

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Press release dated 12th May 2017

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Choir go Dutch

More than 30 members of Dacorum Community Choir and their partners were warmly welcomed in the Netherlands on their most ambitious foreign mini-tour to date.

DCC provided the choir for a Saturday evening mass in St Bavo’s Roman Catholic cathedral in Haarlem and joined the local choir at the Dominicus ecumenical Protestant church in the centre of Amsterdam the following morning, accompanied at the piano by Judi Kelly.

The Haarlem service included the first-ever performance of a Missa Brevis composed specially for the visit by DCC’s musical director Rufus Frowde.

The performances involved singing in Latin, English, Dutch and even Hebrew, and afterwards Rufus praised the way choir members had coped with differing and unfamiliarsurroundings and forms of service.

The dean of St Bavo’s in Haarlem described DCC as “meistersingers” – praise indeed in view of the prominent cathedral and university choirs currently due to visit the basilica from Britain.

The pastor at the church in Amsterdam welcomed the Dacorum choir as having come from “a very beautiful district of England with green pastures, old villages and churches”. DCC, he said, “sing in a manner that everyone can sing with you without much study or difficult rehearsals, just for the pleasure of singing together and feel that you can do something that makes community.”

The following Saturday, the full DCC choir sang to an appreciative audience of more than 130 at their Spring concert, called “Swing Time,” at Hemel Hempstead Methodist Church in Northridge Way. The programme consisted mostly of the choir’s more usual varied repertoire of popular songs, ending – as is often the case – with Rufus showing the audience how easy it is to join in.

The choir meets at 9.40 on Tuesday mornings during term time at the Church of the Resurrection in Grovehill. No previous experience of singing is necessary. Just turn up! Further details at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org .

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Press release dated 22nd April 2017

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Breaking news

Will you remember where you were when Mrs May announced a snap general election? Maybe not. But I do. I was singing at a specially-extended Dacorum Community Choir rehearsal.

Maybe my phone beeped. If so, I didn’t hear it. My wife announced there was big news as I got home from a post-rehearsal committee meeting, thankfully not too extended.

Big news? A surprise election hadn’t crossed my mind. Later I found a message from our daughter, saying thanks for an enjoyable Easter and by the way …

How come no-one in the choir had mentioned a snap poll? Probably because they didn’t know about it either. Are we the largest group of people in Hemel Hempstead not to check our iPhones for more than two hours, in an age when no-one seems able to cross the street without doing so?

After a lifetime as a journalist, I became probably the last newsman in England to hear the Big News.

But then life is full of surprises, large and small. Especially at Easter, it seems. Like the surprises our three-year-old grand-daughter could hardly bear to keep from her parents. They knew well in advance that the mega secret involved hard-boiled eggs, paints, stencils and help from Gran.

And then there was the surprise birthday card for my upcoming birthday. As visiting grand-daughter and her parents prepared to leave for home, she raced upstairs shouting: ‘’ We mustn’t forget to give Grand-dad his surprise birthday card Mummy! ‘’

The evening of the election announcement, I was watching a MASH episode in which the American army medics celebrated a reported ceasefire in the Korean war. The unit padre Fr Mulcahy led silent prayers of thanks and remembrance of the fallen and then announced a swift return to the ‘’secular celebrations’’. It turned out to be a false dawn. A ceasefire wasn’t agreed till later, and more than 60 years later there’s still no peace agreement in Korea.

On Easter Saturday, the Guardian’s headline had been ‘’China urges US and North Korea to step back from the brink of war’’. Mercifully, at the time of writing and hopefully as you are reading this, war hasn’t broken out (again). That would really have been breaking news I wouldn’t want to hear.

As it is, and despite Mrs May’s announcement, the world keeps turning – and the choir begins its new term.

Our regular Tuesday morning rehearsal had been extended so that, as well as practising Blue Moon, Amazing Grace and other favourites for our Spring concert (see ad in this edition), those of us who are visiting Holland this month could familiarize ourselves with a repertoire more appropriate to cathedrals.  

Happily I can report that our preparations have been going well, with no major surprises. As a Dutch saying goes, Geen nieuws is goed nieuws.

ENDS

Press release dated 22nd March 2017

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Having a Swinging Time

Dacorum Community Choir’s next public performance, at Hemel Hempstead Methodist Church on May 6 (4pm), promises to be a journey through some musical favourites old and new.

Beware when a musical director muses about exploring interesting rhythms.

The songs you’re practising may seem to be the normal sort of stuff, but before you know it, he’s suggesting hiring a saxophonist, a drummer and a double bass player and calling the next concert Swing Time.

Despite its name, our Spring concert isn’t a jazz gig.

The programme ranges from popular classics such as Blue Moon and Goodnight Sweetheart, through Amazing Grace, via a modern version of Hope and Glory, to Pastime with Good Company — a kind of Tudor I Did It My Way.

It’s attributed to Henry VIII, though nobody knows for sure whether he wrote it. As one wag observed, if Henry said he’d written something, nobody argued, for fear they might find themselves with no body.

The concert venue, Hemel Hempstead Methodist Church, in Northridge Way, HP1 2AU, has become a sort of home from home for the community choir. It’s where we recorded the sample of songs you can hear by clicking on Our Music on our website  www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

But the programme for May 6, subject as always to changes up to the last minute, gives a more comprehensive selection of what we sing.

Tickets, which cost L10 (L5 for under18s) and include tea and cakes, are available by calling 07890 288 859 or at the door.

There’ll also be a collection for DCC’s charity this year, Sunnyside Rural Trust, which provides training in horticulture and other practical activities for people with learning difficulties at three sites in Dacorum.

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Press Release dated March 2017

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A spring in our step

Our programme for Spring is taking shape, with rehearsals under way for Dacorum in Song on Tuesday March 14 as well as for a weekend mini-tour in Amsterdam at the end of April.

Dacorum in Song takes place at St John’s Church, Boxmoor, HP1 1JY, starting at 6pm and lasting just over an hour. This year it features children from South Hill school in Hemel Hempstead, and St Thomas More and Greenway schools in Berkhamsted, as well as the community choir – a joint celebration of the joys of singing by young and not so young alike.

It’ll be a varied programme, with short sets from each group, followed by an ensemble piece. Expect some audience participation too!

Some 30 DCC members and partners are planning to take part in the Amsterdam trip, with two performances planned. We’re even learning the Dutch words to a 16th century round to impress our hosts (hopelijk — that’s Dutch for hopefully!)

On Saturday May 6 (4pm), not long after we return, we’ll be giving our Spring Concert at Hemel Hempstead Methodist Church in Northridge Way, HP1 2AU.

This was the venue for the recording last summer of songs which can now be heard via our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir where you can get further information about us.

Click on Our Music for three pieces which give an indication of the range of our repertoire, from a challenging 17th century round by Henry Purcell to a Russian traditional folk song about a birch tree and Follow the Heron, a modern Scottish song by Karine Polwart.

We’ll be celebrating the 40th anniversary of another modern church on Thursday July 13 (5pm): the Church of the Resurrection at Grovehill HP2 6BJ.

We meet there on Tuesday mornings during school term from 9.40 to 11.30. No auditions or experience are necessary. To experience the therapeutic effects of singing just turn up and follow the “sing it after me” technique of our charismatic musical director Rufus Frowde.

There are about a hundred of us altogether, but we’re not known as “the friendly choir” for nothing!

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Press Release dated February 2017

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DCC – a bunch of Loony Lefties?

Accessibility, Diversity and Inclusivity are buzzwords of the current age, despite the nation’s recent lurch to the political right. As a community choir, we are non-political as well as non-religious, after all “Girls just want to have fun” and that goes for tenors and basses too. But political and religious concerns figured in our first committee meeting of 2017. Is our choir a vipers’ nest of socialist radicals, a sanctuary for progressive liberals or the seat of social reactionism?

Our chairman, bless her, can hardly be described as a lingering vestige of the Loony Left. After all she long ago opted to continue with the traditional title of the office despite her gender, preferring its ancient dignity to any possible confusion with an article of furniture or a charwoman. (She does, however, get things done, so she might correctly be described as a ‘woman wot does’.)

When our committee’s deliberations turned to what to do as a social event later in the year, a suggestion was made to organise a coach party to the variety show extravaganza at Thursford in Norfolk, a hugely popular entertainment venue which grew out of a museum for fairground organs and steam engines.

The idea was received with interest, but our resident representative of the Red Ken Livingstone Liberation Front raised a strong objection. “Is it inclusive?” she asked. After all, tickets would be pricey and then there was the cost of the charabanc. We shouldn’t take decisions that involved too much expense for some members, thus excluding them.

“I didn’t hear anyone object when we decided on a choir weekend in Amsterdam” chipped in another member. The committee then embarked on a whistle-stop tour of old ground, as committees are wont to do, assessing the relative merits of past barn dances, quiz nights and murder mystery evenings, who went to them, who didn’t and why. Eventually a decision was taken to investigate alternatives, and there the idea may well rest in peace.

The committee then came to reviewing the contents of the choir’s Suggestion Box in which the headline act was “Could we please sing more carols next Christmas?” Further evidence of the choir becoming a hotbed of dangerous radicalism?

It was a fair point, conceded our musical director. For one reason or another our recent programmes for the festive season had been built around Epiphany and Advent, and the opportunity had also been taken of pursuing a broader repertoire to take account of the festive feelings of non-believers. So adding a bit more christmas to Christmas next time round seemed a perfectly reasonable idea.

Thus enlightenment rules and harmony is preserved in our community choir.

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Press Release dated January 2017

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Wassail whassat?

Chances are, by the time you read this, that you have been wassailed out and back again. But at the time of writing, we’re still full of it – and not done yet, as far as the feasting and merry-making are concerned.

Our Gloucestershire wassail has been performed in venues around the district in recent weeks and our ever-enthusiastic musical director Rufus Frowde has even begun teaching us another one ready for next Christmas !

We’re not a lot clearer, however, what wassailing is or was. His best guess is that it combined carol singing with Hallowe’en-type trick or treating: singing in return for food, drink or plain cash.

Collins dictionary explains a bit more: “a toast of good health made at festivities when much drinking takes place, or singing carols from door to door.”

The Gloucestershire version has an agricultural tone, calling for The Master’s crops and cattle to thrive so that he (and the workers eventually) benefit from a hearty pie and strong beer, not the “small” or weak stuff. A kind of trickle-down feudal economic model.

The new wassail we’re learning also has charity beginning near home: “We are not daily beggars that beg from door to door, But we are neighbours’ children, Whom you have seen before….”

We haven’t resorted to singing from door to door with menaces this Christmas. Perhaps Dacorum isn’t as ready for that tradition as rural Gloucestershire of yore.

But when it came to giving, the denizens of Dacorum showed themselves to be a big-hearted bunch in response to our full festive programme.

On December 3, a service to mark Advent at Holy Trinity Church, Leverstock Green, contributed more than £80 to our annual charity, Sunnyside Rural Trust, which provides training in horticulture and other practical activities for people with learning disabilities at three sites in Dacorum.

Later in the month, commuters dug deep in their pockets in aid of Rennie Grove Hospice Care as we met them at Berkhamsted railway station. (The booking hall has a surprisingly good acoustic.)

There were spontaneous cheers for our rendering of the Twelve Days of Christmas (with actions led by accompanist Judi Kelly) in the Marlowes Centre and at Tesco’s superstore in Jarman Park, where we sang in aid of Age UK.

Charitable giving lives on – and how!

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Press Release dated 21st November 2016

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Busy Christmas for Community Choir

Dacorum Community Choir’s hectic festive season begins on Saturday November 26, when members will sing at Frithsden Vineyard’s Christmas Fair, which begins at 4pm.

Mulled wine, barbecue, tea and cakes will help warm gift-shoppers as the Christmas lights are switched on.

The run-up to Christmas gathers pace with a service to mark Advent at Holy Trinity Church, Leverstock Green on Saturday December 3.

The event begins early at 5pm with children from Leverstock Green Primary school also taking part.

A delightful and varied programme of religious and secular music has been assembled by DCC’s musical director Rufus Frowde and accompanist Judi Kelly under the title Let the Sound Echo Round.

Sought-after soprano Charlotte-Anne Shipley is also contributing to the programme. Since reading music at Oxford University, where she held a choral scholarship, Charlotte-Anne has sung a wide range of operatic and classical parts in Italy as well as nearer home.

Tickets at £10 and £5 (under 18s) are available from choir members or by calling 07890 288859.

At the end of the service there will be a retiring collection in aid of Sunnyside Rural Trust, DCC’s charity for the coming year, which provides training in horticulture and other practical activities for people with learning disabilities at three sites in Dacorum.

Members of the community choir will be supporting other charities as well with several further activities during the festive season.

They’ll be singing to commuters returning to Berkhamsted station on Friday December 9 in aid of Rennie Grove Hospice Care. And the following weekend, they’ll be supporting collections for Age UK at Tesco in Jarman’s Park (on the afternoon of Saturday December 17) and in Marlowes  (on Sunday December 18).

Choir members are also entertaining residents of Queensway House (Tuesday December 13 2pm) and completing DCC’s Christmas schedule with a Community Carol Service at Grovehill Community Centre on Sunday December 18 at 4pm.

DCC rehearses on Tuesday mornings during school term from 9.40 to 11.30, normally at the Church of the Resurrection behind Grovehill shops at Henry Wells Square, Hemel Hempstead HP2 6BJ. 

 Our repertoire ranges from Beatles to Bach, from the Flying Pickets to Purcell, via world music from the Congo to the Clyde.

 No experience of singing is necessary. Just turn up at any time in the year and enjoy the fun, especially if you think you could be a tenor (of either sex)!

 Further details, including occasional changes of rehearsal venue, are on our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

ENDS

 

Press Release dated 3rd November 2016

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Memorable Remembrance

 

We Will Remember Them, a moving composition for junior choirs and orchestra, which was premiered at the Hertfordshire Schools Gala in the Royal Albert Hall in March 2014, will be the centre-piece of a special service for Remembrance Sunday, led by Dacorum Community Choir.

 

Few who were present at the gala concert, including members of DCC who also took part, have forgotten the experience of seeing and hearing hundreds of local schoolchildren massed around the tiers of that imposing Victorian amphitheatre sing the familiar words “We will remember them.”

You can hear and watch it yourself on YouTube, posted by the composer Will Todd https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgDEFvFfPDM

 Basing this ten-minute piece on the poems of Laurence Binyon and A.E.Houseman, he marvellously manages to achieve a work which is reverent and respectful, emotive but at the same time unmawkish, solemn, yet jaunty and even hopeful.

 It was commissioned for the Herts Music Service by Rufus Frowde, who is the founder director of DCC and conducted the massed school choirs and orchestra at the gala.

Geographical references in Houseman’s A Shropshire Lad were subtly adapted for Hertfordshire audiences, but Binyon’s phrases may be better-known:

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, we shall remember them, remember them….

The sung refrain builds to an insistent spoken chant: “Remember Them, Remember Them, Remember Them”, like a fanfare, as if it’s an injunction not to forget.

The Remembrance Sunday service (at the Church of the Resurrection, behind the shops at Henry Wells Square, Grovehill , HP2 6BJ on November 13th at 6.30) will lack the grandeur of the event at the Albert Hall. But there were lumps in the throat and tears in a few eyes as we began rehearsing a few weeks ago.

This may not be surprising, but it is curious.

Relatively few of us now have any memory of war, but in later life most of us have had some experience of personal loss and collective grief. Most of the children at the gala concert were mercifully too young to have experienced either. So who or what are we and they remembering, and why?

Can we remember someone we’ve never known? Does remembrance have to be personal?

Not being able to forget the loss of individuals is sad. A much-missed parent. Or Charlie, the eight-year-old suddenly struck down by anaphylactic shock, whose grandparents are members of our choir and in whose name DCC has raised more than £1000 for the local charity Charlie’s Gift.

Remembering individuals or large numbers of people we never knew in the determination that mistakes of the past should not be repeated can be hopeful.

The dead and injured of two world wars and more recent conflicts. Soldiers and civilians. A Syrian child slumped dazed, dusty and bloodied in an ambulance. A toddler’s body washed up on a Greek beach. Aberfan. Hillsborough.

Remembrance is more complicated the more you think about it. Personal or anonymous. Always sad, but sometimes hopeful and positive.

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Press Release dated 20th September 2016

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BOOM! — It’s us you can hear

DCC resorts to some technical wizardry

Singing in the community presents its own special challenges.

Performing in Gadebridge Park during the summer, in support of Herts Air Ambulance, we found ourselves trying to sing above the noise of generators, fairground rides and excited youngsters.

Sirens, bells and heavy metal cutters provided the background to our participation at the recent open day in the large hangar-like space of Hemel Hempstead fire station.

And already fondly remembered in DCC folklore are our performances in the agricultural ambience of a marquee at the Herts County Show and a village fete where we sang among the stalls and the shunting of a model railway layout.

Not that we’re complaining. It’s good for us to adapt to varied venues. And singing in the community is one of the reasons we exist: sharing what we enjoy doing, promoting the benefits of singing together and giving something back to our roots.

But when we sing in the community we can sometimes find ourselves competing with the community to make ourselves heard! 

Fortunately, we’re now being helped to do that thanks to a generous donation of £500 presented by Carol Smith of the local Lions Club after our gig at Hemel fire station.

Luckily too, one of our members, Doug Forster, is a bit of a technical wizard, to whom specifying, ordering and rigging a sound system is no more of a problem than setting up and maintaining the choir’s website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

No sooner had the committee taken the decision to buy a pair of boom microphones, than they were shipped from Denmark and being demonstrated to members after our first rehearsal of the summer term. Even hardened committee members were astonished at how quickly things can happen sometimes!

At the end of that week, one of the booms was to have been deployed for the first time when we sang at Sunnyside Rural Trust’s Food Garden in Hemel Hempstead on September 17th; in the end, though, the weather changed dramatically and we kept it safely tucked away in the dry.

The Trust, which provides training in horticulture and other practical activities at three sites in Dacorum for people with learning disabilities, is the choir’s chosen charity for the coming year.

Efforts are under way to find suitable secure storage for the equipment we’re beginning to accumulate: not just microphone booms, but speakers and speaker stands, keyboard, keyboard stand, piano stool, advertising banner etc.

Boom mics and sound systems are mainly for big spaces and outdoor events. So don’t worry, if you invite us to sing for your organisation, we won’t turn your meeting into the Pyramid stage at Glastonbury.

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Press release dated 22nd June 2016

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Happy Birthday Your Majesty – and us!

In a busy year of birthdays and anniversaries, our 7th birthday when it comes in a few months’ time may well be marked only by a cuppa and a slice of cake if we’re lucky. But nonetheless it should find us in good heart and voice. Or as Henry Purcell put it: “in sweet delight of time and tune.”

Not that we’re counting the years. As the 17th century composer (or his lyricist) went on to say: “I will not count the care times bring, I’ll only count my time to sing.”

He’d obviously readily grasped the idea that singing makes you feel better, though he hadn’t the evidence we have today that making music together in a group benefits your mental and physical health and wellbeing.

That still applied when we gathered in Queen’s Square first thing on Sunday June 12th to kick off Adeyfield’s celebrations of Her Majesty’s official 90th birthday in the pouring rain that makes England such a green and pleasant land in mid-June. “Long to rain over us,” as our chairman’s husband quipped.

There we were in our summer florals (yes, even some of the men!), the keyboard safely sheltering in the porch of the community centre as a handful of doughty spectators spurred us on, the mood helped by Radio Dacorum’s Matt Hatton dressed as Henry VIII. How lucky we were that the rain relented to a gently refreshing mizzle for our half hour of regal glory. We were certainly not counting the care times bring.

Our busy programme continued the following Thursday with a mini-concert at a Friendship Tea organised by Age UK Dacorum at Emma Rothschild Court in Tring.

Saturday July 23rd sees us singing in Hemel Hempstead shopping centre in support of AViD, the campaign for a community-based arts venue in Dacorum. (It’s later in the day that we plan to make our first recording for our website, as previously reported.)

The following weekend we’ll be singing at the Family Fun Day in Gadebridge Park in aid of the Herts Air Ambulance.

Although we’re known as “the friendly choir” and our Tuesday morning rehearsals are relaxed and informal there’s limited time to stop and chat. But the social life of the choir continues to develop. Following the success of barn dances and quizzes in previous years, another quiz is scheduled for October and planning is under way for a Murder Mystery Evening in November. Another innovation, a choir weekend in Amsterdam, is on the cards for next May. 

The choir rehearses on Tuesday mornings during school term from 9.40 to 11.30, normally at the Church of the Resurrection behind Grovehill shops at Henry Wells Square, Hemel Hempstead HP2 6BJ. This term ends on July 19th.

There are no auditions, no experience is necessary. You don’t even need to read music or know what type of voice you have. Just turn up and give it a try! Further information, including occasional changes of venue, can be found at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org , on Streetlife, or by contacting Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press Release dated 22nd May 2016

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Dacorum Community Choir

Choir goes on record

Since “Community” is our middle name, it’s no surprise that performing for small groups such as social clubs and residents of sheltered housing schemes has become a staple, and welcome, part of our routine. But we also like to have a bigger project now and then. And this year, one new project is tying in rather neatly with another we’ve been hoping to do for some time.

On April 23rd, as previously reported, we marked St George’s Day with a concert at Hemel Hempstead Methodist church in Northridge Way – two innovations in one, as we’d never previously sung at the new church.

We were given such a warm welcome and were so impressed by the acoustic quality of the new building that we decided it would be an ideal place to make our first recording.

The idea is to record some tracks initially to put on our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org  which will  provide a small sample of our repertoire and a ready answer to the eternal question “What does your choir sing?” A CD or mp3 file may follow in due course.

At the last count we’d learnt well over two-hundred songs in the more than six years we’ve been in existence, so our recording will provide only a taster for potential audiences and new singers.

One thing that’s become clear is the extra demands of making a recording compared with rehearsing for a one-off performance.

There’s a tremendous buzz involved in any live event: an edge-of-the-seat ingredient. Weeks of learning and practising, followed by anticipation and even apprehension; “will it be alright on the night? Well, we’ll do our best”. As always, our MD Rufus Frowde instils calm, but there’s always an element of uncertainty. Anything can happen. The best of choirs makes mistakes; sometimes the running order on the day is not what had been decided beforehand, perhaps an extra chorus is added as we go along (Rufus likes to keep us on our toes!); maybe a member of the audience joins in enthusiastically but in his own individual fashion. On St George’s Day, a singer’s toddler provided an impromptu accompaniment to a cello solo with Lego Duplo percussion!

Whatever happens, with a live performance, it’s done, enjoyed and over when the conductor brings it to a close, the applause has ended and the thank-yous have been said. But with a recording, it’s different: the performance, once recorded, is there forever, more-or-less, warts and all. So our Tuesday morning practice sessions at the Church of the Resurrection in Grovehill have involved even more finessing and polishing recently.

The precise ‘play-list’ for the recording was still evolving at the time of writing. Tracks will probably be selected from material we’ve been rehearsing recently, which indicates the broad range of our repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. There’s a round that was around in Shakespeare’s time, a Purcell number about the delights of keeping time and tune, and a 16th century Netherlander’s celebration in Italian of the beauty of singing. More modern works include Only You as performed by The Flying Pickets; a Scottish folk song, Follow the Heron; Guy Turner’s The Song Goes On; and a Hebrew hymn to peace and justice. Who knows, perhaps an Estonian lullaby or a Congolese song about loading bananas will creep in at the last minute?

Watch our website for news about the choir. And listen out too.

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Press Release dated 23rd March 2016

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Dacorum Community Choir

When you’re smiling …….

While it’s not unknown for us to be complimented on our performances, one recent comment particularly pleased us.

“We could see that everyone in the choir enjoyed singing,” wrote Felicity Welchman of Potten End Women’s Institute in a thank-you note after we’d sung for them recently.

We were especially grateful for this feedback because it showed our efforts at smiling more had worked!

Despite the enjoyment we get from singing, it doesn’t always come naturally. When you’re concentrating on learning words and music and remembering everything necessary to give your best, there’s a tendency to look a bit too serious.

Our Musical Director, Rufus Frowde, constantly encourages us to show our enjoyment through the expressions on our faces, particularly by “speaking through our eyes”.

“Imagine someone you know, but haven’t seen for ages, has just walked into the room and you’re pleased to see them; your eyes just light up in pleasant surprise,” says Rufus. That’s how we aim to look when we’re singing.

Now imagine the added demands of smiling, singing AND CLAPPING at the right time. Some time ago, we decided we needed someone to show us when to clap during a particular song that involved (hopefully) synchronised clapping.

Rufus can guide us when he’s conducting, but when our accompanist, Judi Kelly, deputises for him from the keyboard, she doesn’t – multi-talented as she is – have enough hands to play and clap simultaneously.

So our vice chairman, Dianne Drew, volunteered to pioneer the role that became known as the “clap-meister”.

Dianne is no stranger to smiling, but on the night in question, at the WI, it was Margaret Groome who stepped out front as clap-leader and chief smiler, beaming broadly and infectiously throughout, with the results kindly noted by Felicity Welchman.

As it happens, the following week, when the Community Choir performed with local children at the annual Dacorum In Song concert at St John’s church, Boxmoor,  the Maple Grove school choir sang When You’re Smiling (the Whole World Smiles with You.) And being children, they seemed to manage to smile throughout without any effort at all.

Dacorum Community Choir’s next public performance is a concert of music to mark St George’s Day, on Saturday April 23rd (4pm) at Hemel Hempstead Methodist Church in Northridge Way.  The soloist will be the talented young cellist Anna Menzies. Tickets (£10 and £5 for under-18s) include a good old British cuppa and cakes, and are available from choir members or by ringing 07890 288859. £1 from each ticket will be donated to Charlie’s Gift, the local charity that helps children whose lives are touched by adversity.

 There’s more information about DCC at http://www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

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Press Release dated 16th February 2016

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It’s in the bag for Evie

There was only one problem for retired local headmaster Stan Gillon when he won an attractive fabric music bag raffled by Dacorum Community Choir: his 11-year-old grand-daughter Evie Byford took a fancy to it !

And as it was Evie’s birthday that weekend, she just had to have the bag, especially as she’s no slouch herself musically, playing the flute, violin and piano, as well as singing.

The bag was made by choir member Janet Poll and the raffle raised £45 for Charlie’s Gift, the local charity which helps children affected by illness, bereavement, poverty, or special needs.

DCC have excelled themselves raising money for worthwhile causes in recent weeks, thanks to the generosity of local people.

The choir’s “Joyful Night” concert at St John’s Church, Boxmoor, just before Christmas raised more than £721 for Charlie’s Gift, a result which Nicole Fidler, trustee of the charity, described as “amazing”.

Another £38 had already been raised by some choir members at the Fishery Wharf Christmas market.

More than a thousand pounds was collected for Age UK outside Tesco at Jarman’s Park, where members of the choir sang on the Saturday before Christmas. Alex Labern of Age UK Dacorum said it was their most successful tin-rattling event ever, totalling more than £1052.

Then in early January, DCC’s participation in a service to mark Epiphany at Carey Baptist Church in Marlowes resulted in an offering of £450 by members of the congregation towards UNICEF’s work for refugee children.

Appropriately, one of the songs members of the community choir are learning at the moment is “We want to sing”, written by Roger Emerson, which links the joy of singing with making the world a better place and showing needy people they are loved.

Our next public performances will be on Wednesday March 9, celebrating 100 years of the WI at Potten End village hall (8pm), and on Tuesday March 15, when we’ll be taking part with local children in Dacorum in Song at St John’s Church (6pm).  Then on Saturday April 23, we’ll be marking St George’s Day at Hemel Hempstead Methodist Church in Northridge Way (4pm).

The choir meets on Tuesday mornings from 9.45 to 11.15 at the Church of the Resurrection, behind the shops at Henry Wells Square, Grovehill, Hemel Hempstead. After Easter, rehearsals will begin five minutes earlier, and end 15 minutes later.

More details at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org.

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Press Release dated 1st February 2016

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It’s turning into a year of celebrations for DCC

Legends, patriotism and centenary celebrations seem to be emerging as the themes of Dacorum Community Choir’s programme for 2016.

From King Arthur and St. George to “jam and Jerusalem”, they’re all in the mix – and more besides.

In early March (Wednesday the 9th to be precise) we’ll be helping members of Potten End Women’s Institute celebrate the WI’s centenary year with a performance at the Village Hall from 8 to 9pm.

Less than a week later, DCC will be joining young singers and musicians at the Dacorum in Song concert at St. John’s Church, Boxmoor. That’s on Tuesday March 15th, starting at 6pm.

Then on Saturday April 23rd, the choir will be performing in its first concert marking St. George’s Day, which will be held at the new Hemel Hempstead Methodist Church in Northridge Way, Hemel Hempstead.

And looking ahead to September 10th, we’ll be celebrating a hundred years of music to mark the centenary year of Lions Clubs International – venue to be announced.

Shaping an appropriate programme is a challenging task for our Musical Director, Rufus Frowde, but it’s already under way with, among other songs, the legend of King Arthur as imagined in Rick Wakeman’s 1970s prog rock musical of that name.

A more traditional rollicking number pays tribute to John Barleycorn and the nation’s debt to beer and barley – on which Hertfordshire’s economy was largely based in more recent centuries.

People often ask choir members “What do you sing?” As this emerging programme suggests, the answer can be more or less anything. Last year, we went through a phase of religious music although we’re not a church choir. But traditional songs, both British and international, along with popular classics and classic pop are our more usual fare.

We long ago topped our initial target of a hundred members and are not actively recruiting, but new faces turn up practically every week at our friendly informal practice sessions and we do our best to make each and every one feel welcome.

Rehearsals take place on Tuesday mornings during school term time from 9.45 to 11.15, normally at the Church of the Resurrection behind Grovehill shops at Henry Wells Square, Hemel Hempstead HP2 6BJ. Please note: half-term will be on February 16th, and the last rehearsal of this term will be Tuesday March 22nd.

Further information about the choir, including occasional changes of venue, can be found at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org , on Streetlife, or by contacting Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press release dated 17th December 2015

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Three kings come riding in

Just when you thought Christmas was over, Dacorum Community Choir are marking Epiphany, the festival of the Three Kings, in their first performance of 2016.

They’ll be adding their voices to those of the congregation at Carey Baptist Church in Marlowes on the evening of Sunday January 10th.

Choir members will be rehearsing at Carey Baptist church on the previous Tuesday morning, but the first regular Tuesday rehearsal of the new term will be on January 12th at the Church of the Resurrection, behind Grovehill shops.

The choir’s Epiphany programme includes, appropriately, Kings Came Riding, a modern carol written by Kevin Stannard , a senior academic at Wolverhampton University.

Other pieces include two which were performed at the choir’s Christmas concert at St John’s Church, Boxmoor, on December 8th: What Child Is This?, sung to an arrangement of the tune of Greensleeves, and Poor Li’l Jesus, a Louisiana spiritual. There will also be traditional seasonal favourites during the service.

It’s been a hectic festive season for DCC.

The Boxmoor concert raised more than £700 for Charlie’s Gift, a local charity which helps children affected by adversity.

Choir members helped launch the festivities at Grovehill and Chaulden shopping centres and at Frithsden vineyard. They also entertained members of the U3A at Boxmoor Playhouse and residents of Sheldon Lodge in Berkhamsted, as well as supporting Age UK by singing at Tesco, Jarmans Park.

DCC meets on Tuesday mornings during school term time at Grovehill church from 9.45 to 11.15. There’s more about the choir on www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org and on Streetlife, or for further details ring Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press Release Dated 22nd October 2015

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Community Choir sing at Palace of Westminster

Members of Dacorum Community Choir have taken part in a Eucharist service in the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft beneath the Houses of Parliament – a first for the choir and the historic chapel. We were the first external choir for 400 years to sing there.

The occasion was arranged by Hemel Hempstead MP Mike Penning and Dacorum borough councillor Rosie Sutton, a former choir chairman. Being within a royal palace, the chapel is in the charge of the Lord Great Chamberlain, and painstaking negotiations were necessary in order to meet protocol.

The chapel is a colourful example of High Victorian decoration applied to one of the few medieval ecclesiastical remnants to survive the great fire of 1834 which all but destroyed the Old Palace of Westminster, necessitating the building of parliament as we know it today.

Holy Communion is celebrated there twice every Wednesday during parliamentary sessions and is open to members of parliament, peers and parliamentary staff. During the service, the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt joined the small congregation, which included Mike Penning, who is minister for policing.

The Rev Rose Hudson-Wilkin, who officiated, combines the roles of Speaker’s Chaplain, priest vicar at Westminster Abbey and vicar of the inner London parish of Dalston and Haggerston. Born and raised in Montego Bay, Jamaica, she has also been a chaplain to the Queen and was the subject of Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs not long ago.

Under their musical director Rufus Frowde, and accompanied from the keyboard by Joseph Beech, DCC sang 21st century settings of the Kyrie, Sanctus and Agnus Dei by Jonathan Eyre, as well as the canon Non Nobis Domine, sometimes attributed to the Renaissance composer William Byrd, and led the congregation in an arrangement by Ralph Vaughan Williams of “I heard the voice of Jesus say” with words by Horatius Bonar from the 19th century.

The choir were thanked by the Rev Rose, who said she hoped it wouldn’t be our last performance at Westminster, and by Mr Penning, who acknowledged that he only sang Swing Low Sweet Chariot, and probably wouldn’t be doing that again soon, following England’s rugby world cup defeat by Australia.

At the time of writing, the choir are preparing for the first of their Christmas concerts, This Joyful Night, which takes place at St John’s Church on Tuesday December 8th. Led by Rufus Frowde, with accompanist Judi Kelly, it will feature a children’s choir from Aycliffe Drive primary school and soloists. Tickets at £10 and £5 (under-18s) are available from choir members, or 07890 288859 and on the door. There will be a collection in aid of Charlie’s Gift, the Hertfordshire-based charity which helps children whose lives are affected by adversity.

And before that happens, members will give a small concert for Hemel Hempstead Rotary’s group for the visually impaired at the Blind Centre in Boxmoor. DCC is always interested to hear from community groups who would welcome such an event.

We are friendly and informal, and we sing everything from pop classics to folk. And, as of last month, bits of the Latin Mass !

We rehearse on Tuesday mornings during school term from 9.45 to 11.15, usually at the Church of the Resurrection, behind the shops at Henry Wells Square in Grovehill, Hemel Hempstead.

For further details, including occasional changes of venue, see our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org , Streetlife, or phone Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press Release Dated September 2015

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Community Choir looks ahead to autumn

The new term starts for Dacorum Community Choir on Tuesday September 8th. With about a hundred men and women already signed up, DCC is not actively recruiting new members, but as always they are warmly welcomed by this friendly and informal group.

Weekly sessions take place on Tuesday mornings during school term from 9.45 to 11.15, usually at the Church of the Resurrection, behind the shops at Henry Wells Square in Grovehill, Hemel Hempstead.

As ever, the rule is “just turn up and give us a try”. There is no need to have sung before, even alone in the bath.

Rehearsals are taken by our musical director Rufus Frowde or accompanist Judi Kelly, who use a “sing it after me” technique.

You don’t need to know whether you’re a soprano or a bass. There are no auditions and there’s no need even to be able to read music, though inexpensive lessons are available for those who want to do so. If you decide to join, the membership subscription is £30 per term, but it’s the choir’s policy that difficulty in paying is no obstacle to membership.

With “community” as our middle name, we believe in sharing the pleasure we get from singing, which has been shown to benefit individuals and the community at large. Members of the choir perform for local groups, such as old people’s homes and social clubs, and we welcome invitations to do so.

We also give full-scale concerts from time to time. Plans are in hand for two events at St John’s church, Boxmoor, and Carey Baptist church in Marlowes, Hemel Hempstead, around Christmas. Social activities planned for the autumn include a barn dance and quiz. Watch this space for details!

For more information, including details of occasional changes of venue, can be found at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org , on Streetlife, or by contacting Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press Release dated August 2015

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“It’s a boy” joy for Community Choir

Dacorum Community Choir’s successful summer term ended in joyful celebration of the birth of a son to musical director Rufus Frowde and his wife Polly, their first child.

The happy event was marked by the presentation of a cot quilt hand-crafted by DCC secretary Catherina Petit-van Hoey. “I made it with love,” she said, adding that the appliqued animals were not just for the little one’s amusement, but also marked the fact that Polly is a vet!

Choir members had had two other surprises in store for Rufus at the final rehearsal of term. He was greeted by applause as he walked into the Church of the Resurrection in Grove Hill. Then, when he thought he was beginning routine warm-up exercises, the choir launched instead into an unexpected rendering of “Where will the baby’s dimple be?” led by accompanist Judi Kelly.

The previous week began with the choir taking part in Dacorum in Song along with local schoolchildren at St John’s church, Boxmoor, led by Camille Maalawy, head of Dacorum Music School. The choir’s busy week ended with a performance at Leverstock Green’s village fete. You could have heard a pin drop in the village hall when choir member Audrey Jeffers sang Gershwin’s Summer Time, a very appropriate choice for the occasion.

At Dacorum Community Choir we sing for fun and we aim to share our enjoyment in the wider community, as our middle name suggests.

Our membership is also drawn from the community at large. The choir is open to all, and members come from many parts of Dacorum. No auditions or previous musical experience are necessary. Just turn up if you want to give us a try; you’ll find that it’s not for nothing we’re known as “the friendly choir”.

The choir meets on Tuesday mornings from 9.45 to 11.15, usually at the Church of the Resurrection, behind the shops at Henry Wells Square in Grovehill, Hemel Hempstead. Our autumn term begins on September 8th.

Further details, including information about occasional changes of venue, can be found at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org , on Streetlife, or by contacting Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press Release Dated 27th May 2015

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Community and Friendship

Residents at Tring’s Emma Rothschild Court enjoyed a Friendship Tea organised by Age UK Dacorum with entertainment provided by Dacorum Community Choir.

They were joined by guests from elsewhere in the town and from neighbouring villages.

Visitors and residents alike joined enthusiastically in the singing, which included community song-sheet favourites such as The Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond and Bobby Shafto. Musical director Rufus Frowde also demonstrated how easy it is to learn new songs, leading the choir and audience in popular rounds from around the world.

It was the latest event in a busy Spring and early Summer schedule for DCC which has included entertaining King’s Langley Evergreens at the community centre in The Nap and the Heather Club at Carey Baptist Church in Hemel Hempstead.

Not for nothing is “community” DCC’s middle name, and not for nothing are we also known as “the friendly choir”.

The choir recently held its first Come and Sing event at Grovehill community centre and a Concert for Spring at St Mary’s Church Apsley in aid of the church’s music fund.

Dacorum Community Choir now has nearly a hundred members. We meet on Tuesday mornings in school term between 9.45 and 11.15am, usually at the Church of the Resurrection behind the shops at Henry Wells Square in Grovehill. Further details about us, including occasional changes of venue, can be found at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org , on our Streetlife page or by contacting Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press Release Dated 19th May 2015

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Smiles all round at singing event

Smiling faces said it all during and after Dacorum Community Choir’s first Come and Sing event, aimed at newcomers to singing.

The three dozen new singers who joined an equal number of choir members at Grovehill Community Centre were invited to give feedback afterwards. All but one of those who filled in a form ticked the smiley faces boxes, showing they’d enjoyed the experience and would sing again.

“We were delighted with the response,” said DCC chairman Sally Davies. The idea was to share the joy of singing with a friendly and informal choir, rather than to recruit new members, but several of the newcomers were to be seen at the choir’s next rehearsal.

“We wanted to make it as easy as possible for people to just come along and they did,” added Sally, explaining that a grant from Dacorum Borough Council’s Health and Wellbeing fund had enabled the event to be held free of charge.

Musical director Rufus Frowde began the singing with an Aboriginal welcome, using his “sing it after me” technique. In a little over two hours, participants had learnt seven songs in languages ranging from Congolese to Polish, Hebrew and even English, with backing from Richard Sisson on piano. Rhythmic clapping, foot-stamping and comic movement added to the fun.

Dacorum Community Choir now has nearly a hundred members. The choir meets on Tuesday mornings in school term between 9.45 and 11.15am, usually at the Church of the Resurrection behind the shops at Henry Wells Square in Grovehill. The next rehearsal is on June 2nd.

Further details, including information about occasional changes of venue, can be found at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org , on Streetlife or by contacting Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press Release dated 21st March 2015

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Dacorum Community Choir

We’ve had a busy time this Spring term learning new songs and preparing for concerts and events in April and May.

Our first outing is on the afternoon of Thursday, April 2nd, between 2.30 and 3.30 pm, when we’ll be singing for and with the members of the Evergreen Club who meet in the Community Centre in Kings Langley.

After Easter we will once again be with the Heather Club, a social club for those with the early signs of memory loss, who meet in Carey Baptist Church. This will be on Wednesday 16th April, between 1.30 and 2.30 and we look forward to meeting the members who joined in with us with such enthusiasm on our last visit.

Our major performance in May will in an event organised by St. Mary’s Church, Apsley, on the afternoon of the 9th, in aid of their church music fund. The concert will start at 5.00 pm and the church is providing home-made teas after the singing. We are delighted to welcome soloist Camille Malaawy and organist Richard Sisson to join us.

Tickets are £10 and can be obtained from any member of the choir, by contacting Jean at the church, or on 01442 215245.

Then on Thursday, 21st May, between 2.00 and 3.00 pm, we will be singing at an Age Concern Friendship Tea at Emma Rothschild House in Tring.

However, the main event organised by us will be our open ‘Come and Sing’ afternoon on Saturday May 16th, which is being run as part of Volunteer Arts Week 2015. It will be at Grovehill Community Centre off Henry Wells Square, HP2 6BJ, with singing between 2.00 and 4.30 pm.

Our musical director, Rufus Frowde, firmly believes singing is for everyone to enjoy.

Whether you’ve sung in a choir before or never sung before – all are welcome. You may have always wanted to sing, but believed it was not for you. Perhaps you were put off at an early age by being told you couldn’t sing. Just come along and give it a try – you’ll be pleasantly surprised and we can promise that you’ll have fun.

To quote one of our members; “The whole community spirit of all working together, no matter what our ability, and ending up with acceptable and sometimes excellent results is so beautiful.”

There will be plenty of us there to offer support and encouragement – you certainly won’t be singing on your own.

What is more, there is no charge. Registration is from 1.30pm and there will be tea and cakes and a chance to chat with members from 4.30. Please phone Sally on 07890 288859 if you want any further information.

The choir now numbers about 100 and we welcome new members at any time. We meet in term time on Tuesday mornings between 9.45 and 11.15.

Our regular base has been Astley Cooper School in St. Agnell’s Lane, Grovehill. But at present we are often rehearsing at the Church of the Resurrection, behind the shops at Henry Wells Square in Grovehill. Please check our website for the latest information.

You can get further details about us on www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org , on our page on Streetlife or by contacting Dianne on 01442 874988.

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Press release dated  17th February 2015

Singing is good for you (official)* ………….

and it’s great fun too.

We want to spread the word that singing is for everyone.  So, as part of Voluntary Arts Week, 2015, we are holding a ‘Come and Sing’ event on Saturday, 16th May, at the Grovehill Community Centre, HP2 6BJ from, 2 -4.30.

Whether you’ve sung in a choir in the past or whether you’ve never sung before – all are welcome. You may have always harboured a desire to sing, but believe it is not for you. Maybe you were put off at an early age by being told you couldn’t sing. Just come along and give it a try – you’ll be pleasantly surprised and we can promise that you’ll have fun.

There will be plenty of our members there to offer support and encouragement – you certainly won’t be singing on your own.

Rufus Frowde, our musical director, tells the story of a lady who came up to him at the end of one of the early rehearsals after the choir was founded in 2009 and said that she was eighty years old and had never believed that she could sing, but the choir had helped her to find her voice. So, it’s never too late to try something new.

If you have any questions about the event, please call or text 07890 288859.

Here are what some of our members say about the choir.

‘The whole experience is fun. It’s an opportunity to meet with other people from a wide and diverse population particularly now that I am retired. I always look forward to coming, even on the days when physically it is a struggle.’

‘The social side of the choir is important too – we get to know each other and make new friends.’

‘Rufus and Judi (our accompanist) are both excellent in the way they engage us in singing, it is never a chore and we are treated well and never talked down to or undermined.’

‘Singing is a great mood lifter. I always come away with a big smile on my face.’

‘The choir is famous for its friendly and inclusive approach – I love it!’

‘For me the choir has been very important in coping with the loss of my daughter. Singing lifts the spirit and prevents me falling into depression.’

Further details about us can be found on our webpage www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org or our page n Streetlife.

*All together now: singing is good for your body and soul ….scientists show that choir practice is healthier than yoga. Daily Telegraph 10.7.2013

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Press Release dated 19th January 2015

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Dacorum Community Choir Christmas Performances

December was a very busy time for our members. Apart from entertaining our visiting choir from Neu Isenburg, Hemel’s twin town in Germany, to a Barn dance and joining with them in concert in St. John’s, Boxmoor over the weekend of 5th/6th and 7th December, we also participated in festive celebrations in various venues around Dacorum.

On Saturday, 29th November, we managed to be in two places at once! Some of our members sang at the Frithsden Vineyard Christmas Fayre, whilst a separate group sang for the Grovehill Christmas lights switch on. The next day, around 25 of us, led by Judi Kelly, our accompanist, sang in Queen’s Square, Adeyfield to a very enthusiastic crowd, including the Mayor and Mike Panning, our MP. The audience joined with us in some of the well-known Christmas songs.

Our Christmas term ended on 16th December, but we had two further performances. On Thursday, 18th, we sang at Probus Christmas event at Boxmoor playhouse. For the first half of the event, we performed from our seasonal repertoire, including the late John Gardner’s jubilant arrangement of ‘The Holly and the Ivy’ which was loudly applauded.

After scrumptious mince pies and sausage rolls, provided by a Probus member, we joined with the members in singing some more familiar numbers. Our musical director, Rufus Frowde, tuned in to his bass notes in leading us in ‘Good King Wenceslas’ and we split into 12 mini choirs for ‘The Twelve Day of Christmas’, which was quite challenging but good fun.

Two days later, we joined the congregation of the Church of the Resurrection in Grovehill in their Christmas Crib concert. The church was beautifully decorated and several of the children took part in playlets illustrating the Christmas story. A fitting start to the holiday.

January 6th, saw the choir reassemble for the spring term.

We are in the process of developing a programme for 2015 and have some dates already in place, including a performance at the Evergreen Club in King’s Langley on April 2nd. We have a Spring Concert planned for May 9th, at St. Mary’s Apsley and will be hosting a ‘Come and Sing’ workshop as part of Volunteer Arts Week on Saturday, May 16th. More details of all these events will be given nearer the time.

We have a very enthusiastic membership and like to think that we deserve our reputation as the ‘friendly choir’. New members are welcome at any time of the year. Please visit our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org or speak to Dianne on 01442 874988.

If you might be interested in the choir singing for your organisation please call Sally on 01923 260440. We would particularly like to expand our performances into residential homes and other community groups. We have sung in the past for ‘Singing for the Brain’ and the ‘Heather Club’, amongst others and our members really enjoy these events.

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Press Release dated 16th December 2014

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Dacorum Community Choir Advent Concert

“St. John’s Church in Boxmoor was packed, with standing room only, on the 6th December for our concert ‘The Song Goes On – Music for Advent.’ The event was in support of DENS, the local homelessness charity and as a result of a leaving collection and a contribution from ticket sales, £1,000 was raised for this worthwhile cause

Melodia Boys and Girls, our sister choir from Neu Eisenburg and the talented young musicians from the Dacorum Youth Orchestra joined us in what proved to the highlight of a wonderful weekend. 

Twenty-three singers from Germany, plus a representative from their town-twinning association, arrived in Hemel on the afternoon of Friday the 5th, after a flying visit to the sights of London in the morning.

That evening, over 120 of us from the choir and our visitors joined together in a Barn Dance at Hemel Hempstead School. Everyone participated with enthusiasm and the hall rang with laughter as occasionally some of the more complicated moves caused a bit of chaos. But we all agreed it was great fun and the band, Cloudburst, said they rarely enjoyed so much audience participation. 

And then on a very cold Saturday with freezing temperatures all day, Dacorum and Melodia came together again. There were so many amazing performances from the choirs and the orchestra, but special mention must be made of the Neu Isenburg choir singing Happy Christmas (War is over) with soloist Barbara Kornek leading the singers.

To mark the 100th anniversary of the beginning of world War I, a reading was given of memories from soldiers from both sides who took part in the Christmas Truce. During the reading the choirs joined in the singing of Stille Nacht/Silent Night, signifying the historic cooperation of two warring sides in a memorable and unique occasion. 

Rufus Frowde, who opened the evening with an organ solo, Toccata on Veni Emmanuel by Andrew Carter,  compered the event and conducted the Dacorum choir and the youth orchestra.  Melodia Boys and Girls were conducted by Oliver Seiler.  

Councillor Allan Lawson, Dacorum’s mayor, gave a short speech in which he said that the Community Choir had gone from strength to strength since their founding in 2009.  “Indeed this year” he added,  ‘they have gone from the Albert Hall (in March) to Queen’s Square, Adeyfield in December.”  

Anthony Culley, the chair of the trustees of DENS, thanked the choir for choosing them as their charity for the concert. He went on to say that DENS helps and supports homeless single people and others in crisis in Dacorum through the Night Shelter, Day Centre, Foodbank and supported housing.

DENS is run by 12 trustees, 23 staff and over 150 volunteers. He said; ‘Since January we have provided food parcels to over 3,500 people and supported and helped a further 350 people. Sadly the demand is ever increasing.”

There are so many people to thank for making the weekend memorable and it is impossible to list them all but the following deserve special mention; the hosts who looked after our visitors in their own homes (in fact, the German party were in danger of missing their bus back to Heathrow on Sunday morning because of the repeated rounds of hugs and kisses which were exchanged); those who contributed to the weekend by making mince pies for the after concert refreshments; the four readers at the concert, Karen Peart, Roger Harvey, David Eastham and Rachel Copley from Melodia Boys and Girls; the strong men who helped before and after the concert with the erecting and dismantling of the staging and the moving of the choir pews and so many more who helped in so many ways, not least by singing their hearts out.

 As always our thanks go to Rufus, our Musical Director who challenges and inspires us in equal measure and Judi Kelly, our amazing accompanist who tries, vainly at times, to keep us on the straight and narrow. 

 We meet again after Christmas on 6th January. Further details of our choir with information about rehearsals and membership can be found on our webpage www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org or our page on Streetlife.”

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Press release dated 16th October 2014 

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Dacorum Community Choir

Over the last weekend of the summer choir members raised almost £500 for charity in two events. On Friday 19th September, at the annual quiz hosted by Di and Bill Stevens, the raffle made £105 for our nominated charity hope for children.  It was a most enjoyable evening. Thanks to Di and Bill, all those who provided the delicious food, those who donated raffle prizes and last but not least those who came and put their knowledge, or ignorance, to the test in supporting the event. 

On an autumnal morning on Saturday, 20th September thirty-six singers, plus musical director, Rufus Frowde and accompanist, Judi Kelly, braved the horrors of long delays on the M1 and the atmospheric mist shrouded rural lanes of deepest Hertfordshire (the SatNav came in very handy) to sing in the Festival of Village Choirs held at the Princess Helena College in Preston, near Hitchin.  

 The concert was organised to raise funds for the Macmillan Cancer Centre at the Lister Hospital in Stevenage and our singers contributed  £380 toward a total of £4,800  collected for the cause. Eight choirs sang, including a polished performance from the year 7 choir from the college, comprised of girls who had joined the school this term and therefore had had only two weeks to rehearse.

 All the singers had the great pleasure of singing, and listening to a variety of songs by the other choirs, in a wonderfully acoustic hall.  We sang ‘Deed I Do’, the Hebrew song ‘Al Shlosha’, and the Appalachian folk hymn ‘Wayfaring’ Stranger’ from our repertoire which includes music from all around the world.

Rufus compered the event and at the end he told a story which illustrates the unique experience offered by community choirs.  He recounted that at the end of one of the early rehearsals after the choir was formed in 2009, a lady came up to him and said that she was eighty years old and had never believed that she could sing, but the choir had helped her to find her voice. So it’s never too late to try something new and singing has been proved to be good for both physical and mental health.   It’s also a great way to meet new friends.

 After the concert Judi said: “Working with the choir is the musical highlight of my week. The energy, enthusiasm and sheer enjoyment of the singers makes it a truly joyful experience”.

 The choir reached the final six in the most innovative creative organisation category at the Heart of Flame awards held at the Weston Auditorium in Hatfield. The winners were Rhythms of the World – congratulations to them.

But the Hertfordshire Schools Music Gala held at the Albert Hall, in which we took part, won the Hertfordshire Lifestyle and Legacy Partnership Award.  Congratulations to Herts Music Service and in particular to our very own Rufus Frowde, who was the Artistic Director for the event. Very well deserved!

We have  a full programme of events planned over the Christmas period, firstly singing a the Grovehill Christmas Lights switch on in Henry Wells Square, Hemel, from 6pm on 30th November.

Over the weekend of December 5th, we welcome members of the Melodia Choir from Neu Isenburg, Hemel’s twin town, on a return visit. Some of the choir went to Germany last year and had  most enjoyable time. We hope we can reciprocate when they visit us.  We will be hosting a barn dance to welcome them on the Friday evening and on Saturday, 6th they will be joining us and the Dacorum Youth Orchestra in our concert ’The Song Goes On’ at St. John’s Church, Boxmoor.  The concert starts at 7pm and tickets, priced at £10 and £5 (under 18s) are available from choir members or by phoning the box office on 07597 195814.

 On the 18th December from 9.30am to 11.30am we will be singing in the Probus Christmas Event at the Boxmoor Playhouse.

 November saw the 5th anniversary of our foundation, in a collaboration between the Hertfordshire Music Service, Astley Cooper School and Rufus Frowde.  The choir started with about 30 members and, at the last count we numbered over 100.  We meet on Tuesday mornings from 9.45am to 11.15am in term time, normally at the Astley Cooper School, HP2 7HL*. New members are always welcome at any time of the year – there are no auditions. You can get further details from our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org, by ‘phoning Dianne, our membership secretary,  on 01442 874988, or you can just come along to a rehearsal, you’ll find us a friendly bunch.

 * occasionally we meet elsewhere – details are posted on the website

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Press release dated 10th October 2014

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Dacorum Community Choir

Rosie Sutton the chair of the Dacorum Community Choir, along with other members, attended the Heart of Flame award ceremony in the Weston Auditorium at the University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield on the evening of Saturday October 4th.  The choir had been one of 25 nominees in the most creative business/organisation of the year category.  They are proud to have reached the final six.  However, the Hertfordshire Schools Gala 2014, organised by the Herts Music Service, won a Hertfordshire Lifestyle and Legacy Partnership Award.  The choir are especially proud of this achievement, not only because they took part, but because their musical director, Rufus Frowde was the artistic director of the Gala.  They feel it was a well deserved recognition of the work that Rufus, and others in the Music Service, put in to making the gala an unforgettable experience for performers and audience alike.

In December the choir welcomes the Melodia Choir from Neu Isenburg, In Germany, Hemel’s twin town and have a programme planned for the weekend which includes a barn dance to welcome the visitors and a concert at St. John’s Church, Boxmoor, on Saturday 6th December.  As well as the two choirs, the Dacorum Youth Orchestra will be taking part.  Further details will be available on the website.

Dacorum Community Choir, a mixed voice choir, meets on Tuesdays in term time between 9.45am and 11.15am at the Astley Cooper School. They number about a hundred and new members can join at any time of the year. All are welcome – there is no audition and  fees are very reasonable. You will find more details on www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org, by telephoning membership secretary Dianne on 01442 874988, or you can just come to a rehearsal and give them a try.

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Press release dated 4th September 2014

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Dacorum Community Choir

Cheers and applause greeted the Dacorum Community Choir when we joined in a singalong with members of the Heather Club at Carey Baptist Church on the afternoon of September 1st.

The Heather Club is a weekly social club for the elderly, the frail and those with the beginnings of memory loss. It has been in existence since 1982 and gets its name from the day it was formed, 30th November, also known as St Andrew’s Day.

Around forty-five choir members sang and there were about twenty from the Heather Club. The afternoon began with us singing from our repertoire of world music. Many of the Heather Club joined in with songs that they knew and then Rufus Frowde, our musical director, led the assembly in singing some old familiar tunes, ending with a rousing chorus of ‘What shall we do with the drunken sailor?”, complete with actions.

Judi Kelly accompanied on an amazing Art Deco piano. She later remarked that she’d never seen anything quite like it before!

The Heather Club members were a most enthusiastic audience and joined in with glee when their turn came to sing.

One of the gentlemen commented: “It’s been wonderful – the best yet.”. and another said: “Brilliant. Singing with the choir brought back so many memories of my youth. I would recommend singing to anyone with memory problems.”

At the end of the afternoon we were asked if we would come back soon.

Dacorum Community Choir meets on Tuesdays in term time between 9.45am and 11.15am at the Astley Cooper School. We number about a hundred and new members can join at any time of the year. All are welcome – there is no audition and our fees are very reasonable. You will find more details on our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org, by telephoning membership secretary Dianne on 01442 874988, or you can just come along to one of our rehearsals and give us a try.

Stan Gillon, one of our tenors, would like to send a personal message to all you shy men out there. “We need just a few more voices to get the best sound.” He thinks that some more men would help tremendously, men who enjoy singing and would like to join the existing twenty or so male voices in a very special and sociable choir.

Our next public performance will be on September 20th at the Festival of Village Choirs being held in in the Princess Helena School in Preston, near Hitchin between 2.30pm and 5.30pm.  The event is in aid of the Lister Macmillan Cancer Centre and all the performers will be paying to sing. Tickets are on sale at £10 each and can be obtained by emailing Lisa at villageconcerttickets@gmail.com.

 

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Press Release dated 3rd September 2014

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DAYTIME SINGING IN HEMEL

Have your children just started school? Are you retired? Are you free during the day?

Have you sung a lot or do you just sing in the bath, but have always wanted to sing in a group?

We’re a Hemel based community choir with 100 plus members who rehearse in the daytime. We meet on Tuesday mornings in term times at the Astley Cooper School in Hemel Hempstead, HP2 7HL, from 9.45 to 11.15am You can join at any time, there are no auditions, all are welcome. (A few more men would be nice!)

Please check out our website on www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org.uk for full information. There is a page for ‘urgent news’ which is updated weekly in case there are any changes, e.g. to our venue.

We normally start singing promptly at 9.45 am, but there will be someone at the school from 9.30am to welcome you if you decide to come along and suss us out – you’ll find we’re a friendly bunch.

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Press Release dated 18th August 2014

 

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DACORUM COMMUNITY CHOIR

A new banner, designed by member Clara Wilmott-Basset, was unfurled at the group’s last meeting of the summer term, and greeted with enthusiasm by choir members. The banner will be on show at rehearsals and used, wherever possible, when the choir performs in public.

It was agreed that the past year, the fifth since the choir was formed in 2009, was an outstanding one, both for singers and audiences. There were a number of performances during 2013/2014; but two were particularly memorable.

In September 2013 the choir acted as the chorus in Jonathan Dove’s community opera, ‘Tobias and the Angel’, with its exhilarating finale. Three members, Martin Boutland, George Chant and Doug Forster sang the parts of Raguel’s men in a comic turn which the audience loved. In March this year the choir sang, alongside young musicians, to a large and appreciative audience at the Royal Albert Hall in the Hertfordshire Schools’ Gala.

The singers really put their hearts and souls into both performances.

Member, Janet Robinson, said: “I joined the choir 18 months ago with some trepidation but soon started to look forward to every session and didn’t want to miss any. I am so glad I took that first step and came along. The choir is so friendly and welcoming to newcomers, but most of all it’s great fun!

We’ve had the opportunity to sing with professionals in ‘Tobias and the Angel’. It was a real challenge but such a fantastic learning experience. We were also given a chance to sing at the Royal Albert Hall – an experience I’ll never forget.

Taking part in performances and concerts is exciting and fun but is not compulsory. We have an outstanding leader in Rufus Frowde and an excellent accompanist in Judi Kelly.”

A special vote of thanks is due to Rufus and Judi, and to the committee, under the leadership of Doug Forster, Emma Reed and Stan Gillon, for their sterling work in applying for grants, organising venues and transport and generally keeping the members in order. (Two did manage to get lost at the Albert Hall but were fortunately found just before the coach left.) A special mention should also be made of the tremendous support the choir gets from The Astley Cooper School which, among other things, provides an excellent hall for rehearsals.

Most of the committee retired at the end of the year and a new committee has now been formed with Rosie Sutton as chairperson and Catherina Petit-van Hoey as secretary.

Various events are planned for 2014/2015 with the first public performance on Saturday, September 20th at the Village Choirs Festival in aid of Macmillan Cancer Care. The concert is to be held at The Princess Helena College, Preston, Hitchin. The performance starts at 2.30pm and is expected to last about 2 hours.

In December we welcome a group from our sister choir in Hemel’s twin town of Neu-Isenburg in Germany.

The choir, which now numbers a hundred plus, meets on Tuesday mornings from 9.45am to 11.15am in term time. The first rehearsal of the Autumn term will be on September 2nd. This will be at the Church of the Resurrection, Henry Wells Square, Hemel Hempstead although we normally meet at the Astley Cooper School. There are no auditions – all adults are welcome.

Retiring chairman, Stan Gillon, in a message to all those shy men out there, said“I heard one of the tenors say that they need just one or two more voices to get the best sound.” He thinks that three more men would help tremendously, men who enjoy singing and would like to join a very special and sociable choir.

New members are always welcome at any time of the year – there is no audition. You can get further details from our website www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org or by ‘phoning 01442 874988, or you can just come along to a rehearsal, you’ll find we’re a friendly bunch.

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Press Release dated 17th July 2014

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CHILDREN AND ADULTS IN TUNE

Dacorum Community Choir joined local schoolchildren for “Dacorum in Song” at South Hill School in Hemel Hempstead on Tuesday July 15.

For the Community Choir particularly, and no doubt for the schools too, it was the end of a hectic year. Founder/director Rufus Frowde recalled that it began with “Tobias and the Angel”, a biblical folk opera for amateur choir with professional soloists and band. Later in the year members sang at the Hertfordshire Schools Gala concerts at the Royal Albert Hall. It had been a successful year in so many ways, with membership topping 100.

The choir can’t wait to start next term, so much so that its next date is with the Heather Club at Carey Baptist Church on Monday September 1, the day before the first rehearsal of the autumn. The choir meets each Tuesday from 9.45am to 11.15 during school term time at Astley Cooper School in Grovehill, Hemel Hempstead. New members are welcome and no auditions are involved, just turn up.

Among those attending “Dacorum in Song” were the mayors of Dacorum and Berkhamsted, Councillors Allan Lawson and Peter Matthews, who praised all involved, specially mentioning the energy and excitement of the children from South Hill School Choir, Dacorum Junior Singers and Ace of Herts, including two excellent soloists (Florence Kingdon and Elena Veris-Reynolds.)

One comment made, however, was that only a small number of boys took part; come on lads, it takes guts to stand up in front of parents and civic dignitaries and sing your heart out!

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Press Release dated 5th July 2014

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DACORUM COMMUNITY CHOIR AT FESTIVAL

 On the Saturday afternoon of the Wimbledon Ladies’ Final, the World Cup quarter finals and the start of the Tour de France in Yorkshire, it was perhaps not surprising that only a small audience heard Dacorum Community Choir and groups from mid-Herts and Watford perform in a local choral festival that showed the current popularity of singing with choirs large and small, youth and adult.

Though dwarfed by the spacious Edward Guinness Hall at Dame Alice Owen’s School in Potters Bar, the 40 or so listeners were nevertheless equally appreciative. As is often the case at such events they joined enthusiastically in the final song, I’d Like to Teach the World (to Sing in Perfect Harmony), guided by Peter Twitchin, director of the Mid-Herts Youth and Chamber Choirs, who demonstrated pitch energetically by hopping from note to note.

Dacorum’s more restrained but nonetheless inspiring conductor Rufus Frowde, unobtrusively aided by accompanist Judi Kelly, led the Hemel Hempstead-based ensemble through established favourites ranging from a traditional Macedonian folk song (Shto mi e milo), to the Nigerian highlife number O-re-mi  and Roger Emerson’s Shoshone Love Song. The choir ended its set with the Appalachian folk hymn Wayfarin’ Stranger. This followed the majestic and moving Al Shlosha, in Hebrew, extolling the importance of Truth, Justice and Peace, which the community choir learnt specially for this performance.

Members combined with the other choirs to end the concert as a whole with the spiritual All My Trials and the Noah’s Ark-based marching song Vive L’Amour.

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Press Release dated 24th May 2014

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DACORUM COMMUNITY CHOIR SING AT COUNTY SHOW

 Dacorum Community Choir Singing Whilst it Rains!

 The first day of the annual Hertfordshire County Show was marred by very poor weather with some extremely heavy falls of rain. 

Fortunately the Hertfordshire County marquee became alive during the afternoon with some sparkling entertainment from the Dacorum Community Choir.

This was the fourth year running that the Choir had been asked to be put on a short concert for the visitors to the County Show. Before the concert began the rain fell in torrents and made the crowd run for shelter. The County marquee was the ideal place. 

The atmosphere for the concert was one of fun and the Choir excelled.  The cramped conditions meant that Judi Kelly, the accompanist, lost visual contact with the Musical Director, Rufus Frowde, from time to time.  But all concerned gave of their best to pull off an enjoyable performance.

Songs from many countries were well received.  These songs developed into rounds and the sound got better and better.  A new song to the Choir, ‘Hear the Wind’, was sung beautifully and the audience showed its appreciation.  The popular ‘Goodnight Sweetheart’ brought the 40 minute concert to a close.

 The Choir had enjoyed itself.  Lots of rehearsal time had been spent for this event and, as always, practice made it near perfect.

 As one member of the Choir said, “That was great.  Hope we can come again next year.”

 Wishes do come true!

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Press Release dated 24th April 2014

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Dacorum Choir Sings in the Community

The sounds of singing and laughter echoed from the walls of St. George’s Church Hall in Chaulden last Tuesday.  The friends of ‘Singing for the Brain’ joined with a small group of Dacorum Community Choir members for an afternoon of music.  The host was Kerry Brabant.  Kerry organised those who attended, along with their aides, to an hour of non-stop music with actions which everyone really enjoyed.

 Ynis Richardson, a member of Dacorum Community Choir, had introduced the idea of the get-together.  Rufus Frowde, the Musical Director of the Choir, agreed the idea, Kerry gave her support and led the afternoon session.

 The programme was well thought out in order to combine the different groups in such a way that everyone could be satisfied.  It was a big ask but Kerry had it planned, Rufus accepted and all put their heart and soul into the event.  The ‘Welcome’ song and the ‘armchair warm-up’, which included smiling, led up to the first song the opening line of which was ‘A you’re adorable’.

 The Choir sang with the friends two popular songs ‘When the Saints Go Marching In’ and ‘Swing Low Sweet Chariot’.  The difference being that the group of singers was divided into two and both songs were sung at the same time!  The results were so pleasing. 

 ‘Delilah’, sung with great gusto, brought the afternoon to an end.  The enjoyment for everyone was obvious and it was agreed that this sort of session should be repeated.

 Jack Baynton-Glen, a regular attender, had found the session exciting and well presented.  He shared his appreciation for Kerry and Rufus and felt that all who had been present had had a wonderful time.

 Two days later the venue had changed.

 The Centre in the Park is a place where the older people of Dacorum can go to enjoy company, have lunch, play games or just chat every day of the week.

 Last Thursday was different.  Twenty singers representing the Dacorum Community Choir joined the regular members for a shared concert of singing.  Sue Reynolds, hosted the occasion, and welcomed Rufus Frowde, the Musical Director of the Choir.  Rufus introduced the varied programme of songs to be sung.

 It was a lovely afternoon and Pat Haffenden a popular member, explained that it had come as a real surprise to her and gave all of the members a treat.  “Rufus was extremely nice, he carefully encouraged us to join in and patiently taught us the words of some of the songs.  This enabled us to sing along with the Choir which was special.”

 At the end Sue Reynolds thanked the Choir and presented Rufus with a donation for the Choir’s funds.

 Before we left Rufus announced that for the fourth year running the Dacorum Community Choir had accepted an invitation to sing at .the Hertfordshire County Show.  This will be on Saturday 24th May.

 New members of the Choir are always welcome. Please check our website at www.dacorumcommunitychoir.org

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Press Release dated 20th March 2014

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Dacorum Community Choir join children for Gala Concerts

The biennial concerts held at the Royal Albert Hall earlier this month once again illustrated the tremendous musical talents of the young people in our Hertfordshire Schools.
 
Two choirs, each of over 1000 primary aged children, performed in either the afternoon or evening concert.  These choirs were supported by the Hertfordshire Schools’ Symphony Orchestra, several musical groups, dancing groups and soloists provided a rich feast of musical entertainment for the sell-out crowds.
 
For the first time the Community Choirs of Dacorum and Hatfield Welwyn had been invited to share the opening and closing songs of the performances.  This was a dream come true for so many people.
 
To say it was a pleasure to be at the Gala Concert was absolutely true but to be a member of the choir, along with the children, was something never to be forgotten.
 
Rufus Frowde, the Artistic Director, chose these words to explain how the Concert had come about. “I reflected on 100 years of musical development.  I turned my thoughts to popular music and our concert began to take shape.  Today we commemorate and reflect upon the centenary of the outbreak of World War l with a powerful commission by Will Todd.  Despite the misery of war, life was still for living and we did not forget how to have a good time.  Music, song and dance never ceased to beguile, comfort, entertain, console, energise and calm the human soul.  Musical and dance styles evolved, each decade coloured by its own energy and spirit.  Children performed today alongside adult singers from recently-formed community choirs.  All ages share the joy of the 100-year artistic journey that has driven us to the Britain in which we now live, a country still with its challenges but thankfully more peaceful than 100 years ago.”
 
The Concert highlights?  There were so many.  From the rousing opening of ‘O Fortuna’ by Carl Orff to the final song ‘Viva la Vida’, made famous by Coldplay, ended with a crescendo to end all crescendos.  The crowd rose to their feet to applaud and cheer, long and loud, the dancing, the singing,the musicians and the Hertfordshire Schools’ Symphony Orchestra.
 
Through narration, songs, dancing, Charleston, Jazz, Glenn Miller, Rock and Roll, Pop Music, the 100 years of music had been brought to life by the expertise of the young people.  Their tremendous energy was commendable.
 
How much time, how many people, how much patience, skill and dedication did it take to put on this Concert?  Nobody knows but all of it proved worthwhile.
 
At the close of the Concert one great grandma said so passionately, “I never dreamed I would be at the Royal Albert Hall today singing with my 10 year-old great granddaughter, Elisia”.
 
James Dickinson, Head of Herts Music Service,had  promised the audience a highly exciting performance demonstrating the breadth and depth of the musical achievements of the County’s children and young people.  He congratulated Katherine Wolfenden and her team for leading on this huge project.  All the conductors, directors, primary school teachers and 2500 performers were thanked profusely.
 
As the audience filed out at the end of the concert Henry, aged 4, said ” Can we come again next week”.
ENDS

 

Press Release dated 19th December 2013

STARTS

A Five Star Show for the Dacorum Community Choir 
 
The festive season has given the Community Choir numerable opportunities to sing with and for so many people in Dacorum.  The Choir performed in public on five occasions in the weeks running up to Christmas.
 
The first of these occasions on Sunday 24th November was for the Choir to take its turn on the bandstand in Marlowes to sing at the ‘Switching On’ of the Christmas Lights.
 
Secondly the Choir members joined Councillor, Terry Douris and Mike Penning MP for Christmas carol singing at Grove Hill.  Other Councillors, families and friends formed a sizeable group and the youngsters in the audience did the count down to the switching on of the lights.
 
Riverside, on the 7th December, was the venue for two short concerts the Choir sang for the shoppers who stopped to listen whilst others hurried to and fro buying their Christmas presents.
 
The following day the Choir joined members of the congregation at Grove Hill Church to sing seasonal songs from their repertoire to slot in between the carols being sung during the service.
 
Finally the Choir presented ‘Star Bright’ an evening of seasonal songs and organ music at Carey Baptist Church on Wednesday 18th December.  The Deputy Mayor, Allan Lawson accompanied by his wife, joined the very large audience packed into the Church to be entertained by the Community Choir and two visiting artists.  Rufus Frowde, the Musical Director of the Choir, had prepared a very interesting programme giving the Choir members significant challenges and opportunities to excel with a whole variety of songs.
 
The concert opened with the bright, powerful song ‘Star Light Star Bright’.  Rufus then invited the audience to join in the first of the three carols everyone would sing together.  Spaced throughout the programme the Choir performed items which included ‘We’ve been awhile a-wandering’, a traditional Yorkshire carol arranged by R.Vaughan Williams, ‘When Christ was Born of Mary Free’ by John Gardner and ‘Rise up, Shepherd, an’ Foller’ a traditional American spiritual.
 
Charlotte-Anne Shipley, well known to Hertfordshire Children’s Music, sang the solo ‘O Holy Night’.  Her soprano voice filled the Church with a beautiful clear sound which was much appreciated.  Later in the programme Charlotte-Anne gave her own interpretation of the popular classic ‘White Christmas’.
 
Richard Hills, who is renowned in Hertfordshire for his brilliant playing of the organ, performed a long and improvised medley of Christmas songs.  It was such fun and held the audience spell-bound by its surprises and musicality.  He received a tremendous ovation.
 
Judi Kelly, the much appreciated accompanist of the Choir, deserves a special mention for her encouraging, friendly and sympathetic support throughout.
 
The concert helped to raise £721.00 for ‘Hope for Children’, an international charity, which was founded in Hemel Hempstead in the mid 1990’s.  Chris Lyne, for Hope, gave an interesting address and was most enlightening.
 
Readings, which were most appropriate, were given by Anne Lyne, Doug Forster and Sally Davies.
 
Emma Reed, Chairman of the Choir, speaking after the event said,”We thoroughly enjoyed our last concert of the year and we were delighted to perform to such a large and enthusiastic audience.  Our Choir is all about bringing people together to enjoy singing and I think we achieved that tonight”.
 
Of course new members for the Choir are always welcome.  Rehearsals take place at Astley Cooper school, Grove Hill, from 9.45-11.15 a.m. each Tuesday in term time.  (Contact number 07736 473069 or 01442 217340).
 ENDS